Awakening to our Shift in Consciousness Through Tragedy

In my last blog post, I predicted that the outcome of the UK’s election would produce a third shock to the established political system. I linked my prediction to the tragic mass event of the Manchester bombing of the Ariana Grande concert on May 22nd and explained that this “terrorist” created event was, like most acts of violence, spawned from a deeply rooted belief in our collective unconscious—the belief that we are unworthy.

Any individual that invests (albeit unwittingly if indoctrinated) their own energy in support of this belief is on a slippery psychological slide down the slope of self-esteem ending in the perpetual torment of feeling powerless in the world. From my last Blog:

If you believe that you are unworthy in some way, you cannot believe that you are a uniquely powerful being. Terrorists want others to feel as disempowered, as fearful, as terrible, as Continue reading “Awakening to our Shift in Consciousness Through Tragedy”

Afraid of Spiders? (Part 2 of 2)

Arachnophobia – symbolic of our fear of disconnection?

After lunch, I headed over to the teaching room for the start of sessions. I picked out a chair from the circle placed around the room and sat down. As I waited for my fellow students to arrive, my thoughts turned to my conversation with Karina. Her remarks on the symbolism of spiders as told by the indigenous tribes of the Amazon, was both encouraging and intriguing to me.

I’ve always had a professional fascination with the fear of spiders. In my counseling work, I’m aware that treating arachnophobia requires a different approach from other phobias and irrational fears. The therapeutic technique I use from Energy Psychology methods has its own distinct protocol. Furthermore, when it comes to irrational fears, arachnophobia beats all. Interestingly, it is the most prevalent phobia in the Western world—yet apparent not so within indigenous cultures.

  • What is it about spiders that puts them top of the scary things list?
  • Why is this phobia such a significant part of the human condition?

Our Western rational minds cannot figure this out. Our fearful response to spiders far outweighs their inherent threat to our survival. After all, the majority of spiders are quite harmless and their physical presence is hardly an imposing one—unless they gang up of course.

Continue reading “Afraid of Spiders? (Part 2 of 2)”

The Best Way to Respond to Violence

Do you fear for the world and its children—in light of the horrendous acts of violence committed by religious fundamentalists?

Have you lost faith in your Faith—in view of the latest and historic abuse carried out by those entrusted with the care of our children?

Why do we create such abhorrent events for ourselves? What makes us perpetuate such violent acts, and how should we respond to violence in order to remove it from our co-created reality?

The quick answer to the why, is that we are creating such events in order that we do something about one of our most pernicious beliefs entrenched within our collective psyche—that, as individuals, we believe we are disempowered.

The historic and still pervasive abuse of children, spouses, other life forms, and the Earth itself, together with the escalating acts of terrorism, might suggest that we are all off to “hell in a handcart.” This may well be the case if we do not deal with the beliefs we hold that can no longer be part of our psychological structure. Violent events are created by the disempowered. For violence to diminish in our reality, we must first address the belief that our individual power has no worth. [bctt tweet=”Co-created, painful “mass events” always tell us to examine and question our belief systems.”]

Continue reading “The Best Way to Respond to Violence”

Je suis poking Charlie (part 2 of 3)

So, our “problem” with beliefs is nothing to do with beliefs themselves, as they are neutral psychological constructs developed by our egos so that we can make sense of the world. The problem lies with the amount of energy our egos assign to our beliefs over time—both from an individual’s standpoint and collectively as groups. Putting a great deal of energy behind a belief, particularly emotional energy, is what propels them from being “open to debate” into incontestable camouflaged beliefs masquerading as absolute “truths.”

We need to understand the true nature of beliefs*

When we emotionally nurture a belief into a truth, it becomes serious. That is, we can no longer examine them, debate them, or make fun of them—according to our egos. We solemnize them. Religions are very good at solemnizing their beliefs. Moreover, when beliefs are seriously solemnized they can very easily turn into “laws”—seen by our egos as universal laws that must apply to everyone, whether they believe in the beliefs that created them or not!

But beliefs cannot be truths. Remember, there is only one Truth—the Oneness of Consciousness/All-That-Is/Your God. Your ego may be adamant that some of its beliefs must be true, but they are always only your personal truths—the beliefs you imagine to be true.

Beliefs of any description are not Truth; therefore, they cannot be taken seriously!

Continue reading “Je suis poking Charlie (part 2 of 3)”

Ebola – the new Black Death (part 2)

We can regard the Ebola outbreak in West Africa as an event calculated (at a higher level of human consciousness) to shock us into a realization that our (collectively held) thoughts and beliefs surrounding social equality are still in desperate need of revision.

The epidemic is a traumatic “mass event” designed to change and modify our collective thinking, and eventually our core beliefs, in relation to the issue of egalitarianism. Integral to our overall “shift in consciousness,” this event aims to highlight a profoundly disturbing element within our belief systems, which needs to be corrected before we can evolve as a species able to operate at a cooperative, global level of awareness.

Seth on the nature of epidemics:

The question of epidemics, for example, cannot be answered from a biological standpoint alone. It involves great sweeping psychological attitudes on the part of many, and meets the needs and desires of those involved—needs which, in your terms, arise in a framework of religious, psychological, and cultural realities that cannot be isolated from biological results. (Seth, The Individual and the Nature of Mass Events: A Seth Book. Roberts, J. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc.; 1981. p.20.)

"Danse Macabre" by Michael Wolgemut
“Danse Macabre” by Michael Wolgemut

The Ebola crisis is, as was the Black Death in the 14th Century, a physical outpouring of the need within us to effect a psychological change—a change in the way we think that will reverberate through to the very core of our belief systems. The Ebola crisis is one, perhaps of many crises (we usually need a few), that wants us to look within (once again) and examine the core beliefs we hold about being a human being. Remember that our core beliefs* form the filter through which we express our Selves as a species.

A crisis in any domain of human activity is asking us to look at our beliefs that underpin the expression of that activity.

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is a scaled down version if you will of the Black Death of the Middle Ages. The message then was to look to our collective belief systems and make the changes necessary to make our developing pockets of civilization (countries) more egalitarian—thus making life healthier and more fulfilling for a greater percentage of the population.

The same message underscores this Ebola outbreak. Only this time we are talking about the absolute necessity for egalitarianism to be a fixed principle within our collective mind as we evolve into a global civilization.

Continue reading “Ebola – the new Black Death (part 2)”